🤷🏻‍♀️

So, I’ve struggled with whether to write and what to write and why to write. Because there are things I want to talk about, but I can tell they’re not the popular things, and I’m just really troubled by this societal tendency toward escapism. I mean, I think social media plays a big part in that – rewarding us with likes to talk about “this” and not “that.” And I totally know that the world is very overwhelming right now, and I’m not saying you should take a bath in it 24/7, but I do think there’s a big difference between coping and ignoring.

I’ve written about this before, more than once, but admitting uncertainty and discomfort is not a bad thing. It’s just a hard thing. It does not make you negative. It does not make you dramatic. It makes you real and whole. I think there is so much benefit to gratitude-based thinking, and to generating positive energy, and to being hopeful, but I also think that “good vibes only” culture is more toxic than it is helpful. I don’t think we should punish ourselves or each other for acknowledging that sometimes things are very bad, or for needing to talk about fear or sadness. We shouldn’t be worried that sharing this aspect of our lives makes us less likable.

I don’t know, maybe I’ll write more about that soon. Or share some other things I’ve learned. I don’t know. I’m tired.

My garden is growing! I have to tell you, I’m surprised. I essentially planted seeds in a clay pit and hoped for the best. I don’t know what I’m doing. I made a bunch of mistakes. That’s okay. I mean, don’t get me wrong – I beat myself up about it some. But I am very grateful to my garden for helping me be a little more gentle with myself. And also, no one breathes coronavirus on me out there, so that’s nice.

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David also scraped and repainted our entire shed/garage. He was very grumpy, but he has the patience of a saint, and so it turned out great. ❤️

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We’re also getting our downstairs windows restored! We initially looked at window replacement, but the consensus of the old-home experts was that we weren’t really losing any more energy through our windows than we are through our poorly insulated walls, so why not try to maintain the charm of originality. (These windows worked for 100+ years, so I suppose that’s saying something.)  And now, they’re going to work even better, and look so pretty and way less chippy, and I’m quite excited. I don’t have any “finished” pictures yet, because it’s a very long, window-by-window process, but I’ll be sure to share them as soon as I have them.

Projects we’re dreaming of: a pergola/outdoor entertainment area, updated patio furniture and working grill, storm doors (this one keeps getting pushed, you may have noticed), an upstairs addition, a downstairs half-bath, central HVAC, bathroom renovation, restored hardwood floors…

I’m also putting a pool on my 10 (15?) year plan. I’m currently in search of investors (free membership for life!), but I’ll dig it myself if I have to.

Guys, here’s what I’ll leave you with today: Read things. Try to know stuff, but realize you don’t know everything. Ask questions. Get uncomfortable. Change your opinion when presented with new information. Say “thank you,” and wash your hands.

Thanks for coming to my Ted Talk.

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